More knife work

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This close up shows work underway to correct errors in the registration number under the starboard wing. I'm also working on the external tank which somewhere along the line lost the correct drawing. I also saw a minor error on the cable cover under the pilot's arm. The letters and numbers gave me a deal of trouble. Other painters probably sail through these difficulties but I confess they stumped me for a while. In the end I resolved the problem by drawing the numbers under the wing of my little 1/72 model and finding a photo of the AEW3 at Gatwick. It was at almost the same angle as my painting. So a lot of intense looking, cussing and endless cups of tea later it came right!! Once this was sorted I began to strengthen the reflection of the radome, using a little cadmium yellow mixed with yellow ochre. Next came the deck lines which I have deliberately knocked back so that they do not divide the painting. What remains now is to work a little more on the figures and begin laying in the washes for the flight deck.
What I do
I created this area to describe the work I enjoy and how I go about it. My first shot at this was trying to illustrate the process of making an aviation painting destined to be submitted to the Guild of Aviation Artists Summer 2012 exhibition. I now include a similar "day by day" account of the creation of a wildlife painting. So instead of propellers and people the problem now is fur and rocks!

I've had a couple of cracks at wildlife before as you have seen on this site and at www.painters-online.co.uk where I have posted similar images. This time I was inspired to try the Leopard after attending a workshop given by Chris Jones at the Nature in Art Museum in Gloucester. Chris is an internationally known artist and a very good teacher. Although the course was "Painting fur and feathers in acrylics", I've taken some of his advice and used it to provide a framework for this oil painting.