Leopard Drawing

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Outline drawing - acrylic black over pencil drawing
Here you see the first marks to establish the subject. I had roughly sketch this with paper and pencil so was confident enough to go with this image size. Using the Acrylic Black paint I suggest some of the markings on the leopard. I used acrylic because it dries very quickly and I confess I was in a hurry to get to the oils. You can speed up the drying time by using a hair dryer if you wish. At this stage I really want to establish the pose and make sure that my drawing follows the photo fairly accurately. Past experience tells me that I will have to go back over the markings as the painting progresses and I begin to look much more intensely at the photo. I should say I have no hang ups about using photos for my paintings, provided they are MY photos. Other photos from the net, books or magazines I use only to learn how to draw the subject.
What I do
I created this area to describe the work I enjoy and how I go about it. My first shot at this was trying to illustrate the process of making an aviation painting destined to be submitted to the Guild of Aviation Artists Summer 2012 exhibition. I now include a similar "day by day" account of the creation of a wildlife painting. So instead of propellers and people the problem now is fur and rocks!

I've had a couple of cracks at wildlife before as you have seen on this site and at www.painters-online.co.uk where I have posted similar images. This time I was inspired to try the Leopard after attending a workshop given by Chris Jones at the Nature in Art Museum in Gloucester. Chris is an internationally known artist and a very good teacher. Although the course was "Painting fur and feathers in acrylics", I've taken some of his advice and used it to provide a framework for this oil painting.